Lang:
Italian LanguageEnglish languagespanish language
follow facebook
home pagetopicshealthsports shoessporting eventscommunity

Hallux valgus

Hallux valgus

Hallux valgus

The initial discomfort is extremely light, small dense along the toe or first metatarsal head, then creates a small deviation of the hallux and first metatarsal head of the stick. From this it follows that the dynamics of the pitch and the thrust of the foot begins to be less physiological and functional, that creates the first discomfort in walking and a lower return for the run. Years ago it was thought that the foot was the cause of postural changes and problems that they spread to the upper body. Today we have seen that it is precisely the opposite: the foot adapts to changes in posture that comes from the upper body.
This is because the foot is an intermediary between the ground and the tallest structures, so it can adapt to compensate. But any adjustment is actually a structural transformation that over time you pay with pain and impaired function with consequences such as bone and joint injuries to the forefoot and even serious repercussions on the knees, hips and spine.
The deformity of hallux valgus is often associated with flat feet, because the reduced curvature of the plant leads to overload in an exaggerated manner the front foot, and can result, in addition to injury or strain to the second and third toes, reaching drown the entire second finger up to touch the third. The cause of hallux valgus can be congenital, with a tendency to develop age accretion or acquired, in the latter case, a major responsibility can be attributed to inadequate shoe models the physiology of the foot, such as shoes high heels or narrow toe. In fact, the first piece of advice to be given to those suffering from this disease is to use appropriate footwear.
The best shoe for foot health is one that returns to its natural form, which provides support arch and has a smooth and seamless uppers and a flexible sole underneath the toes, as do most of sports shoes.
And if you really want the heel, no more than four or five inches. A good shoe, in fact, has a relatively flat sole and heel and fits snugly to the front must be big enough to accommodate the tip of the foot. As a preventive measure, the specialist can also suggest orthotics or orthopedic shoes that are designed to avoid an overload of the forefoot or recommend physical therapy interventions.